Can’t afford gym membership? Then join the hoards of Brits going running in their lunch hour

Can’t afford gym membership? Then join the hoards of Brits going running in their lunch hour According to a new study, more Brits than ever are boycotting the gym in favour of running during their lunch hour.

Whilst many of us can think of nothing else but a delicious carb loaded pasta salad or ham and pickle sandwich by lunchtime, others are thinking about donning their keep fit gear and going for a quick run.

A new trend is sweeping offices up and down the country and is seeing workers swap their loafers and courts for a pair of trainers in a bid to fit keeping fit into busy lifestyles.

A recent study has revealed that a staggering two million British workers are using their lunch hours to go for a run, covering an estimated three miles of pavement each around three times each week.

According to a spokesperson for the outdoor clothing company Helly Hanson (who commissioned the study), increasingly hectic lifestyles mean that many individuals are too worn out by the end of the day to exercise, which is why more and more people are trying to incorporate it into their working day.

Whilst running in your lunch hour can be an extremely beneficial and convenient way to incorporate exercise into your daily routine, a hot, sweaty, smelly and tired employee is not ideal post lunch break, so here are some handy tips to help you get the most out of your run:

  • Eat something light beforehand. Anything too heavy will sit on the stomach so opt for fruit, nuts or yoghurt.
  • Plan your running route before you go. This way you will know how far you are running and how long it will take you to get there and back.
  • Make sure you warm up with some lunges before you set off, and if you really don’t have time then start with a very gentle jog and eventually build up intensity over time.
  • If you are overweight then running can put excess pressure on the joints. To avoid this make sure you do not sprint on your return jog. Slow down gradually to a walk to let your heart rate come down.

For more information about how to incorporate health and fitness into your daily routine, visit our health coaching page or use the search tool to locate a health coach near you. 

View and comment on the original London Evening Standard article.

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Emma Hilton

Written by Emma Hilton

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